Tag Archives: hunting dogs

RHIANNON

RHIANNON (RIGATONA)

Celtic goddess of horses and the Underworld. A Welsh epic of Mabinogion describes her as Pryderi’s mother and the wife of first Pwyll and then Manawyddan. Her name Rhi Annon (Ri Ana) means ‘the Great Queen’.

ABOUT GODDESS

Rhiannon was a Celtic goddess of horses also known as Rigatona and identified with her continental counterpart Epona, the only Celtic goddess worshipped by the Romans. However, the Welsh mostly know her as the heroin of the First and the Third Branch of Mabinogion saga.

Not much is known about how her cult looked like because no written descriptions remained (the Celts have not written  their history not myths down so they only circulated in an oral tradition). The only items associated with Rhiannon which survived to this day are figures and reliefs of a woman sitting on a horse. Mabinogion is a cycle of Welsh legends which nevertheless were not recorded in writing until the Christian era. Christian scribes in monasteries were removing elements incompatible with the new religion therefore Rhiannon is not referred to as a goddess in the saga*. The first translation of Mabinogion from Welsh into English was not made until half  of the 19th century; the translator was Lady Charlotte Guest, an outstanding personality and the promoter of Welsh culture and literature.

Rhiannon first appears in the First Branch of Mabinogion when Pwyll the prince of Dyfed noticed her while hunting. She was sitting on a pure white horse of large size, with a garment of shining gold around her and when the prince asked his companions whether they knew her, they said they did not. Pwyll told them to ask the lady who she was but she fled on a horse back so quickly that Pwyll’s servants could not catch her. It happened again and again and finally Pwyll became so intrigued that he got on the horse himself and chased the mysterious lady but even having the swiftest horse in the kingdom, he was unable to reach her. At last he was so tired of the pursuit that he called, Lady, please do stop! She did and replied, I will gladly stop and it would have been better for your horse if you had done it much earlier. When she took off the part of a headdress which was covering her face, Pwyll realised she was the most beautiful woman he had ever met. The girl introduced herself as Rhiannon, the daughter of Heveydd Hên who wanted to marry her to a man against her will. She then added, But no husband would I have, and that because of my love for thee, neither will I yet have one unless thou reject me. Of course, Pwyll was not intending to reject her, moreover he added that if he could choose from all the women in the world, he would choose nobody but her. They arranged to meet in her father’s castle in exactly one year time and then parted.

Asked about the mysterious lady Pwyll changed the subject. However, when an arranged time came, he gathered one hundred horsemen and went to Heveydd Hên’s palace where he was welcomed cordially and a feast was arranged in his honour. Pwyll was seated between Heveydd Hên and Rhiannon but the good atmosphere was destroyed at the end of the feast when a richly dressed young man entered the chamber. His name was Gwawl the son of Clud and he was Rhiannon’s wealthy suitor. Gwawl started to talk with Pwyll and manoeuvred the unaware prince to agree on his marriage with Rhiannon. To prevent it, Rhiannon gave a bag to her beloved and ordered him to come back with his horsemen in one year time during her feast before the wedding. She ordered him to wear rags and ask for as much food as the bag could contain and she would use her magical powers to make it bottomless so the guests would wonder what to do to make it fill. Say thou then that it never will, until a man of noble birth and of great wealth arise and press the food in the bag with both his feet, saying, ‘Enough has been put therein’, said Rhiannon. I will cause him to go and tread down the food in the bag, and when he does so, turn thou the bag, so that he shall be up over his head in it, and then slip a knot upon the thongs of the bag. Let there be also a good bugle horn about thy neck, and as soon as thou hast bound him in the bag, wind thy horn, and let it be a signal between thee and thy knights.

This was exactly what happened one year later; hearing the signal Pwyll’s knights entered the chamber, disarmed Gwawl’s companions and cast them into the dungeons. Gwawl himself was still immobilised in the bag until he swore to Pwyll that he would resign from the marriage with Rhiannon, respect Pwyll’s relationship with her and would not take vengeance.  He was released with his people and left immediately. Pwyll and Rhiannon were able to get married. Pwyll gave a lot of gifts to his wife’s kinsmen and then he took  Rhiannon to his castle in Dyfed where in turn she gave gifts to her husband’s subjects.

The marriage was happy but still childless after two years. In the third year the noblemen came to Pwyll to express their sadness that he still did not have an heir. They suggested leaving Rhiannon and marrying another woman who would bear him a son. Pwyll answered that they were married for a relatively short time so they could still have children. Grant me a year from this time, and for the space of a year we will abide together, and after that I will do according to your wishes, he said. A year later Rhiannon gave birth to a healthy son. Tired after childbirth she fell asleep and the baby was entrusted to six women to watch over it at night. However, they fell asleep and when they woke up, the royal heir was gone. Terrified that they would pay for it with their own lives, they devised a plan: There is here a stag-hound bitch, and she has a litter of whelps. Let us kill some of the cubs, and rub the blood on the face and hands of Rhiannon, and lay the bones before her, and assert that she herself hath devoured her son, and she alone will not be able to gainsay us six.

When princess woke up and asked for her son, wicked women started  to persuade her that although they were trying to protect him, Rhiannon ate her own child. Of a truth we never saw any woman so violent as thou, they added. Rhiannon did not get caught by the accusations and assured women that she would defend them if they lied out of fear. They, however, kept lying. Soon the news spread all over the country and people demanded Rhiannon to be put to death for the crime. Pwyll did not agree but felt responsible as a ruler to draw consequences towards his wife. To expiate the act attributed to her, the princess was to sit in the gate to the castle for seven years, tell her story to anyone who did not know it yet and offer that she would carry the traveller on her back into the palace. Luckily, not many demanded that. Although innocent, Rhiannon was enduring her ordeal with dignity and humility.

Meanwhile at the night when Rhiannon’s son was born some other strange events took place. Teirnyon Twryv Vliant, Lord of Gwent Is Coed had an incredibly beautiful mare which regularly foaled on May, 1st but a colt kept vanishing mysteriously. Eventually angry Twryv decided to bring the mare into the house for the time of delivery and to watch over her fully armed. The mare indeed gave birth to a large and beautiful colt but right after that, he heard a great tumult and saw an enormous claw entering through the window and taking the colt. He threw himself at the big hand with his sword and cut it off in an elbow so only the hand with the colt remained. Outside tumult enhanced so Teirnyon ran away to check what happened but it was so dark that he could see nothing. When he came back home, he noticed a baby boy wrapped in a satine mantle lying on the door behold. He brought the baby to his wife and they both decided to adopt him and call Gwri Wallt Euryn for the sake of his blond hair. Boy was growing up rapidly, much faster other children; being just one year old he was bigger than a three year old child, while he was two, he seemed to be six and when he was four, he bribed the grooms to allow him to take the horses to water. Seeing how quickly he was growing, Teirnyon’s wife convinced husband to give boy the colt which was born on the same night as he.

Eventually the news of what happened with Rhiannon reached their castle. Teirnyon felt sorry for her and he started to ask what exactly happened and observed the boy whom he was raising. He noticed his great resemblance to Pwyll and realised he would have to give him back to his real parents. His wife agreed and the same day Teirnyon went to Dyfed with the boy. They met Rhiannon in the gate and in accordance to her penance, she offered to carry them on her back to the palace as a punishment for devouring her own child but Teirnyon refused. They got to the palace where Pwyll welcomed them cordially and invited for a meal. While they were eating Teirnyon told the prince of what had happened in the night when the boy and the colt were born. And behold here is thy son, lady– he said to Rhiannon. – And whosoever told that lie concerning thee, has done wrong. Everyone confirmed boy’s great resemblance to Pwyll and it finished Rhiannon’s ordeal. She called the boy Pryderi meaning ‘Loss’ and Teirnyon was offered great treasures, however being a modest man he did not accept them. Still he was in the great favour of both Rhiannon and Pwyll until his death. Pryderi grew up to be a talented and wise young man and he inherited the throne after his father’s death; he was greatly loved by his people. And thus ends this portion of the Mabinogion.

After Pwyll’s death Pryderi married Kicva and became ruler. He managed to enlarge his lands and went for a war with Ireland together with Bendigeid Vran (Bran) son of King Llyr** who attacked the lands of his brother-in-law in revenge for the treatment of his wife Branwen, Bendigeid’s sister. Pryderi was one of the seven men who survived the bloody battle between the Welsh and the Irish. He came back home accompanied by Manawyddan, Llyr’s other son whom he befriended so much that he decided to marry him to his widowed mother. He arranged a welcome feast to honour his guest and seated him next to Rhiannon. His plan succeeded, Manawyddan and Rhiannon took a fancy to each other and got married soon. For some time Pryderi, his wife, mother and stepfather lived peacefully but one day while they were outside, a storm raged and a strange mist descended on the country. When it disappeared, it turned out that they found neither buildings nor people nor cattles; it seemed as if in the whole Dyfed there was no single person except of the four of them. They remained all alone in their lands for two years but eventually they got bored of having no companionship.

So they set off to England where Manawyddan and Pryderi became so good craftsmen that local guilds turned against them because their products were much more popular  than the local ones. The Welsh decided to leave the town and move to another one but the same history repeated there. They moved to yet another town and again they were better than local craftsmen irrespective of whether they were producing saddles, shields or shoes. Their work made buyers delighted but it also aroused the anger of local craftsmen so eventually they decided that it was useless to stay there and came back to Dyfed. After a month  Manawyddan and Pryderi went hunting. They came across a great boar of pure white which led them straight to a newly built castle which they saw for the first time. The boar ran straight into the castle and Pryderi’s hunting dogs went after him. Since they were not coming back for a long time, he decided to go inside and take them even though Manawyddan suggested staying.

There was not a trace of a boar and hunting dogs inside neither any signs of people living there. There was, however, a murmur fountain in the centre with a golden bowl hanging over it. Pryderi was so amazed by the the quality of craft that he came to the bowl and placed his hands on it. He did not realise it was enchanted and when he wanted to take his hands back, it turned out to be impossible; he could not utter a word neither. Manawyddan was waiting for him to come back until the evening but eventually he returned to the palace and told Rhiannon about what had happen. She reproached him for not accompanying Pryderi and went searching for her son herself. When she entered the castle and saw him, she touched the bowl and fell under the spell too. Thunderstorm came again and mist enshrouded the castle making it vanish.

Kicva, Pryderi’s wife, fell into despair thinking she could lose him, however Manawyddan promised her that she would certainly have him back. Since they had neither hunting dogs nor food, they emigrated to England again where Manawyddan worked as a shoemaker once more. His products were of the highest quality as always so the local craftsmen turned against him and after a year Rhiannon’s husband had to flee from the town. Luckily, Manawyddan and Kicva took a burden of wheat with them to Dyfed so they sow the seeds which grew up profusely. Additionally, Manawyddan went fishing and deer hunting so they did not starve. Unfortunately, when the time of harvest came, it turned out that some mysterious creatures cut all the ears leaving stalks only. Manawyddan decided to watch over crops to save what had remained; it turned out that around midnight a big host of mice appeared on the field and carried the ears away. Manawyddan managed to catch one of them to the glove.

He was going to execute it but then suddenly a man appeared and came closer; he seemed to be a scholar which surprised Manawyddan because he saw no unknown person in this land for last seven years. When they started to converse and a stranger found out what Rhiannon’s husband was intending to do, he was trying to convince him to sell him the mouse. Manawyddan, however, did not agree so the scholar went away. Soon a priest rode with the same offer and  even higher price. Still Manawyddan did not want to sell the mouse so a priest left but Rhiannon’s husband could already see a bishop with his attendants approaching. He offered money again but Manawyddan kept refusing even though the price was getting higher and higher. Eventually bishop offered to release Pryderi and his mother. Manawyddan understood that the mouse is more valuable than it seemed so he additionally demanded the spell to be taken off Dyfed.

Bishop had no choice but to agree. He admitted that in fact he was a mage named Llwyd son of Kilcoed and his pregnant wife was disguised in the body of a mouse. He also revealed that he cast the spell on Dyfed to revenge the insult which Rhiannon and Pwyll made to his friend Gwawl son of Clud. He transformed into mice with his household members and went to Manawyddan’s fields, however because of her condition his wife could not run as fast as the others and was caught. He asked Rhiannon’s husband to release her and assured he would give up his revenge and take spell off Dyfed and he would never do it again. When Llwyd brought Rhiannon and Pryderi back, he returned his wife to him. Life came back to Dyfed and there were people, villages and cattles again. And thus ends this portion of the Mabinogi.

IMAGES, SYMBOLS AND ANIMALS

The animal mostly associated with Rhiannon/Rigatona is a horse. Roman images of a woman riding a horse remained to this day; they probably depict either Rigatona or Epona.

Rigatona

Rhiannon is also connected with the Underworld through her birds. Mabinogion mentions her miraculous birds which sang so sweetly that warriors listening to them fell under their charm for eighty years. Three birds had magical skills to wake the deads up and put the living to sleep. In an old Welsh legend about Culhwch and Olwen, one of Culhwch’s tasks is to get Adar Rhiannon – The Birds of Rhiannon  (he wants to marry Olwen but her father does not accept it and demands from suitors things impossible to get). Birds also appear during the feast in the Second Branch of Mabinogion:  the singing of the birds of Rhiannon (…) and there came three birds, and began singing unto them a certain song, and all the songs they had ever heard were unpleasant compared thereto; and the birds seemed to them to be at a great distance from them over the sea, yet they appeared as distinct as if they were close by, and at this repast they continued seven years.

Other animals associated with Rhiannon are a boar, dogs and a badger (Welsh game ‘a badger in a bag’ was traditionally initiated when Gwawl, Rhiannon’s suitor, was closed in a bag and teased).

Rhiannon is also associated with the symbol of cauldron (magical bowl in a castle), typical for Celtic goddesses (Welsh Cerridwen, Irish Brigid and triple Morrigan), which makes her the goddess of magic. Some researchers claim that similarly to Irish Medb (Maeve) and Welsh Gwenhwyfer (Guinevere) she is the goddess of sovereignty and grants the throne to the man who marries her. Like a Hellenic goddess Demeter she is linked with horses and perceived as the goddess of abundance and fertility.

DIVINATION MEANING

Person

Someone with a great need of moving or a person of a swift mind. Someone who is experienced in life, wise, bright and ingenious. A person of great patience and dignity.

ADVICE

It is you who is right in the situation you are inquiring. Do not let people around you make you believe you are not. Have no doubt of who you are, what you do and where you are heading. You are good enough in whatever you are planning so do not allow fears to destroy your potential.

A gaslightning *** method may being used to belittle you, do not stop believing in your own feelings, impressions and emotions. You are right.

Time to change and move forward. A trip is a good idea.

Reflect deeply on what you are intending to do because you will not be able to turn back the time.

Movement. Velocity. Change. Power. Dignity. Mobility. Internet. Happy ending of a difficult situation.

Love

If you are in the relationship: time of testing or ordeal. Speak honestly about what you want, sometimes it is enough to simply ask for it. False accusations. Re – marrying. Being deprived of/granted the custody over the child.

If you are single: this card suggests meeting somebody during a journey.

Finances

Loss, typically not caused by wastefulness but by decision of an office or a bank. It is possible to compound or to bend the rules in order to change this situation. Departure, most probably abroad.

Health

Beware of falling down and injuries. Endangered parts of the body: musculoskeletal system (bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments).

CARDS

Rhiannon hurrying with horses and birds in The Goddess Oracle by Hrana Janto&Amy Sophia Marashinsky

Rhiannon in The Goddess Oracle by Hrana Janto&Amy Sophia Marashinsky

Rhiannon in The Oracle of the Goddess by Gayan Sylvie Winter&Jo Dosé

Rhiannon in The Oracle of the Goddess by Gayan Sylvie Winter&Jo Dosé

Rhiannon in Goddess Inspiration Oracle by Kris Waldherr

Rhiannon in Goddess Inspiration Oracle by Kris Waldherr

Rhiannon as The Chariot in The Goddess Tarot by Kris Waldherr

Rhiannon as The Chariot in The Goddess Tarot by Kris Waldherr

Rhiannon in The Goddess Oracle Deck by Thalia Took

Rhiannon in The Goddess Oracle Deck by Thalia Took

Rhiannon in Goddesses Knowledge Cards by Susan Seddon Boulet&Michael Babcock

Rhiannon in Goddesses Knowledge Cards by Susan Seddon Boulet&Michael Babcock

Rhiannon in Goddess: A New Guide to Feminine Wisdom by River Huston&Patricia Languedoc

Rhiannon in Goddess: A New Guide to Feminine Wisdom by River Huston&Patricia Languedoc

An interesting representation of Rhiannon in The Goddess Power Pack by Cordelia Brabbs

Rhiannon in The Goddess Power Pack by Cordelia Brabbs

Rhiannon in Goddess Guidance Oracle Cards by Doreen Virtue (I think I have expressed my views about this ‘work of art’ clearly enough in the review of Doreen Virtue’s deck so I will not say a word more)

Rhiannon in Goddesses Guidance Oracle Cards by Doreen Virtue

Rhiannon as Knight of Swords in Universal Goddess Tarot by Maria Caratti&Antonella Platano

Rhiannon in Universal Goddess Tarot deck by Maria Caratti&Antonella Platano

* It also affected other Welsh legends about King Arthur, most probably both Morgaine – Morgan Le Fey and Gwenhwyfer – Guinevere were at first goddesses. Legends about King Arthur have been formed in their ultimate shape around 15th century under the French influence while original Welsh myths are as old as at least 6th century. To be honest these versions often differ like fire and water. Both Rhiannon’s husbands are also considered to be originally gods; Pwyll was the lord of the Underworld while Manawyddan seems to be a Welsh counterpart of Irish god of the sea called Manannán.

** Prototype of Shakespear’s King Lear.

*** “Gaslighting is a form of psychological abuse used by narcissists in order to instill in their victim’s an extreme sense of anxiety and confusion to the point where they no longer trust their own memory, perception or judgment. The techniques used in “Gaslighting” by the narcissist are similar to those used in brainwashing, interrogation, and torture that have been used in psychological warfare by intelligence operative, law enforcement and other forces for decades.

The intention is to, in a systematic way, target the victim’s mental equilibrium, self confidence, and self esteem so that they are no longer able to function in an independent way. Gaslighting involves the abuser to frequently and systematically withhold factual information from the victim, and replacing it with false information. Because of it’s subtly, this cunning Machiavellian behaviour is a deeply insidious set of manipulations that is difficult for anybody to work out, and with time it finally undermines the mental stability of the victim. That is why it is such a dangerous form of abuse. The emotional damage of Gaslighting is huge on the narcissistic victim. When they are exposed to it for long enough, they begin to lose their sense of their own self. Unable to trust their own judgments, they start to question the reality of everything in their life. They begin to find themselves second-guessing themselves, and this makes them become very insecure around their decision making, even around the smallest of choices. The victim becomes depressed and withdrawn, they become totally dependent on the abuser for their sense of reality. In effect the gaslighting turns the victim’s reality on its head.” (from Narcology)

Based on original issue of Mabinogion available online (much to my joy) here: http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/mab/mab20.htm and http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/mab/mab24.htm

as well as English Wikipedia, http://wintergrovecoven.tripod.com/deities.html , http://www.thaliatook.com/AMGG/rhiannon.html , http://www.joellessacredgrove.com/Celtic/deitiesr-s.html, http://www.joellessacredgrove.com/Celtic/deitiesn-o-p.html .

Save

Save

Advertisements

ARTEMIS (DIANA)

ARTEMIS (DIANA)

Goddess of the moon*, hunting, mountains, forests and wild nature, protectress of the Amazones, maidens and virgins.

ABOUT GODDESS

Artemis was a daughter of Zeusa and Leto and a twin sister of Apollo. Leto being Zeus’ lover drew the wrath of Hera his wife and the guardian of women in labour that was why the children could not come to the world for nine days and nights.  When Leto finally bore her first child it was Artemis who then helped her mother to deliver her twin brother.

Artemis never got married. She remained a virgin and she expected the same from her female companions (usually nymphs) who she was spending time hunting and hiking. She was an extremely vindicative goddess whose arrows cause diseases and pierce anyone who who had the misfortune to expose themselves to her. This is what happened to the children of Niobe, the mother of seven sons and seven daughters, who dared say openly that she had more offspring than Leto. Artemis killed Niobe’s daughters and Apollo her sons.That was also the case of Orion, a famous hunter, to whom she sent scorpion to bite him because he was competing with her in discus throw (according to another version of a myth she punished  him because he was pursuing her nymphs and yet another says that when Apollo noticed that his sister is falling in love with a handsome hunter he decided to protect her virginity and made her accidentally kill him). One way or another both Orion and the scorpio were shifted to the firmament and the same happened to Callisto (Kallisto), her companion who fell victim to Zeus’ desire. When she became pregnant, the goddess transformed her into a female bear and baited her dogs on her. Callisto would have certainly died if not Zeus lifted her up in the nick of time and placed in the sky as a constellation of Ursa Major. Another victim of her rage was Actaeon, a mortal man who saw her nude while bathing in a mountain brook. She sent her own pack of dogs against him to tear him to pieces. Also Agamemnon the chief of the Achaeans caused her anger while their ships were heading to Troy.  The goddess caused calm sea and she demanded Iphigenia, his daughter as a sin offering so Agamemnon made her and her mother Clytemnestra come under the pretext of her engagement with Achilles. The most common version of the myth says that when the victim was about to be fulfilled, Artemis took the girl and brought her to Tauris (Crimea) where she became her priestess. She also sent a boar to devastate the areas surrounding the city of Calydon because King Oeneus omitted her during sacrifices. During the hunt for the boar  Atalanta one of her companions became the reason for a huge row which resulted in the death of Meleager, the king’s son.

IMAGES, SYMBOLS AND ANIMALS

Artemis’ symbols are a bow and arrows. Animals commonly associated with her include a bear, hunting dogs, wild fauna and a hind. One of Hercules’ labours was catching alive the Ceryneian Hind who was her sacred animal; a hind was so agile that it took the whole year to finally capture her, hinds were also harnessed to Artemis’ chariot.

When represented in paintings and sculpture Artemis does not usually wear a long chiton and peplos like other goddesses but a knee – length tunic instead to feel comfortable while running and hunting. 

Artemis and Acteon

The goddess was particularly worshipped in the mountainous and wild countries of Hellas such as Arcadia, Sparta, Laconia, Elis and the Taygetus Mountain. However her most famous temple was situated in Ephesus in Asia Minor where Artemis was identified with an ancient Asian goddess of fertility (more about it here and here). In Tauris humans were sacrificed to her.

Artemis of Efes

DIVINATION MEANING

Person

This card signifies a young girl or even a teenager. In her positive aspects she is independent, fit, strong and protective towards the ones she loves.  This person is friendly yet remains distant. Just like Persephone she has a strong bond with her mother and she finds support among other women but she tends to avoid men, relationships and engagement. As an archer she suggests concentration and focusing on an aim and avoiding distraction until you achieve it. In her negative aspects she is vindicative, does not forgive mistakes and it is better not to mess with her. Similarly to Athena Artemis keeps her virginity which may signify the fear of carnality and intercourse.

Advice

This card suggests help and advice from a sister, a female friend etc. It also informs you that you need more movement and excersises and it encourages you to spend time in wild nature (the modern version of Artemis’ activity would be extreme sports).  It is a positive answer to any questions involving sport activities or requiring competition.

Because of its association with the Moon it shows the whole spectrum of what is connected with it in culture, psychology and esoterics: intuition, emotionality, foreseeing the future, romanticism, fantasy, unconsciousness, ignorance, illusion, darkness, ambiguity, confusion, mystery, lies, gossip, self-deception, sorrow, tears, despair, pessimism, nervousness, anxiety, depression, suicidal thoughts, psychosomatic illness, threats, mistaken action or passiveness, hidden issues which need to be explained, mental illness, hallucinations, somnambulism, nightmares, closing oneself off from others, running away from problems into the inner world, disease or drugs, sexual complexes, toxic relationship with a mother and other women.

Love

If you’re in the relationship: a strong influence of a woman on your relationship (a female friend, a mother,  a mother-in-law etc). A lot of emotions but usually hidden and unexpressed. Fears about future. Illusions. Hidden relationship.

If you are single: being single by choice. A pleasant company of the people of the same age. Secret longing for a partner.

Finances

Double check the documents you are going to sign. Do not be deceived by the outward appearance. Promises may not be fulfilled, do not take them for granted.

Health

Problems with body liquids flow, embolism, swelling. Sleep disorders. Coma. Depression, hallucinations and mental disorders. Addictions. Suicidal thoughts. Psychosomatic illness. Infectious diseases. Excessive use of drugs. You need more workout and movement. If you are a pregnant woman, this card suggest either a non-complicated labour  or the help of a competent woman. Endangered body parts: blood and lymph vessels, lymph nodes.

CARDS

A beautiful representation of Artemis in Ancient Feminine Wisdom by Kay Stevenson&Brian Clark

Artemis in The Goddess Oracle deck by Hrana Janto&Amy Sophia Marashinsky (she is portrayed here in an Amazone style)

Artemis in The Goddess Wisdom Cards by Jill Fairchild, Regina Schaare & Sandra M. Stanton

Artemis in The Goddess Wisdom Cards by Jill Fairchild, Regina Schaare & Sandra M. Stanton

Artemis in The Oracle of the Goddess by Gayan Sylvie Winter&Jo Dosé (as Diana)

Artemis in Oracle of the Goddess by Anna Franklin&Paul Mason

Artemis in Oracle of the Goddess by Anna Franklin&Paul Mason

Artemis, a hind&a leaning tower in Goddess Card Pack by Juni Parkhurst

 A very ethereal and oniric image of Artemis in the Goddesses of the New Light by Pamela Matthews, volatile and delicate, it is lunar indeed rather than athletic; she is accompanied by a dog and some hares, symbols of fertility, but remember that despite being a midwife, she does not the goddess of fertility herself

Artemis in Goddesses of the New Light by Pamela Matthews

There is a strange situation in the deck by Doreen Virtue. The Hellenic and Italic goddesses are usually merged semantically while here we have the division into Artemis (Guardian) and Diana (Focused Intention). Artemis’ message is You and your loved ones are safe and spiritually protected while Diana says, Keep your unwavering thougths, feelings, and actions on your target, and you will make your mark. To be honest I do not think it was a good idea.

Artemis in Goddess Guidance Oracle Cards by Doreen Virtue

Artemis in Goddess Guidance Oracle Cards by Doreen Virtue

It is similar with Artemis&Diana in The Goddess Oracle Deck by Thalia Took



 

 And in Goddesses Knowledge Cards by Susan Seddon Boulet&Michael Babcock (first card is Artemis, th second one is Diana)

 Artemis in Goddesses Knowledge Cards by Susan Seddon Boulet&Michael Babcock

 Artemis in Goddesses Knowledge Cards by Susan Seddon Boulet&Michael Babcock

Artemis in Goddess: A New Guide to Feminine Wisdom by River Huston&Patricia Languedoc

Artemis in Goddess: A New Guide to Feminine Wisdom by River Huston&Patricia Languedoc

 A warlike Artemis straight from a computer game in Goddesses&Sirens by Stacey Demarco&Jimmy Manton

A military and modernised Artemis in The Goddess Power Pack by Cordelia Brabbs

Artemis wearing ballerina’s skirt in Mythic Oracle by Carisa Mellado&Michele-lee Phelan (but how can you use a bow and an arrow while hopping on one foot in the clouds? laughing1)

Artemis in Universal Goddess Tarot deck by Maria Caratti&Antonella Platano where she is Knave of Swords (as Diana)

Artemis in Goddess Inspiration Oracle and The Goddess Tarot by Kris Waldherr where she is naturally associated with Moon the eighteenth Major Arcane  (as Diana again).

Artemis in Goddess Inspiration Oracle by Kris Waldherr

*In the Hellenic and Italic mythology there are four deities connected with the sun and the moon:  Helios/Sol and Apollo (sun) and Selene/Luna and Artemis (moon). Helios and Selene had belonged to the Titans, the first generation of gods whose cult was later replaced with the Olympians Apollo and Artemis. Since then Apollo is sometimes identified with Helios and Artemis with Selene, however there is still a certain semantic division. Helios and Selene are the deities who are phisically related to the sun and the moon as they roll the stars over the firmament with their chariots while Apollo and Artemis are their patrons but they do not put them into motion themselves.