Tag Archives: ixchel

REVIEW: THE ORACLE OF THE GODDESS BY GAYAN SYLVIE WINTER AND JO DOSE

THE ORACLE OF THE GODDESS

by Gayan Sylvie Winter&Jo Dosé

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

GAYAN SYLVIE WINTER is the writer who lives in Santa Fe in the USA. She was a model and an actress in the 70’s when she went to India and spent seven years in Osho’s Meditation Centre. She published 25 books and decks.

JO DOSE is a painter and an illustrator. She lives and works with her husband in Sedona in the USA.

Both ladies have already worked together on Vision Quest Tarot.

None of the authors has an official page nor social media sites (Gayan Sylvie Winter is only available on LinkedIn , she also seems to have her FB profile, but it looks like a private one, I have not come across her official page there)

ADVANTAGES

Images are certainly the advantage of this deck. Jo Dosé has done a tremendous work trying to render the goddesses from different lands and times. Her images of goddesses represent the myths, symbols and attributes of particular deities: Amaterasu shines in the skies, Athena has her owl, Demeter – her sheaf, Freyja – cats and falcon feathers cape, etc. There is an eight – pointed star representing Venus above the heads of Astarte, Inanna, Ishtar and Venus who were all associated with this planet.

I am delighted to see Skadi included in this deck, her myth is one of my favourite ones and she is rarely presented in other decks.

Another advantage is definitely a wide range of cultures included in this deck, you will see here goddesses from Mesopotamia, Hellas and Rome, Celtic lands, Africa, India, the Far East, Polynesia and both Americas. Although some of the choices the authors have made might be controversial (see below), the overall choice of goddesses is satisfying.

DISADVANTAGES

I find the booklet added to the cards rather disappointing even though it seems to be a substantial part of the set (big size, bibliography etc.). I find the geographical division to be completely messy, there is no chronological order in the contents so we jump from ‘Universal Goddesses’ through Indian and Chinese Goddesses to Greek Goddesses then Japanese Goddess just to end up with Phoenician Goddess. Phew! I am quite well informed when it comes to different cultures, but for those who are not, this may seem like riding a carousel. I also question some names used: I am not convinced that we can describe some goddesses as ‘universal’, after all they were still created by a particular culture. I totally disagree with calling Hekate a ‘Turkish Goddess’: in the ancient times there was no ‘Turkey’ as we see it now, the areas of modern day Turkey were generally called Anatolia and the mighty Hellenic colonies were present on its coast. Plus mythologically Hekate is rather connected to Thrace than to Anatolia.

The book itself is also rather disappointing. Some basic facts about the goddess are mentioned in each chapter but if you already have certain mythological and cultural knowledge, it is unlikely that you will find out much more.

There is The Oracle part added to each chapter but it seems rather vague and not related to the goddess at all. Here’s an example, the message added to the chapter about Freyja

A message can be understood in many ways…A message talks with many tongues…Learn to tell which message is right. Everything depends on the mind of the person who hears the message; on his or her eyes and ears. The low voices of nature spirits want to show you the way now. But often we don’t listen to the subtle voices that want to help us and follow the confusing voices in our head instead which keep talking to us without respite. Let go of these voices which come from the past and still wish to determinate your future. Let go of the things that suppress you, that hold your spirit prisoner and hide the truth from you.

Learn to see what is precious in your life and do away with things that prove unreal and thus worthless; don’t pursue them any longer. All it takes is a little light to see the difference. Sometimes all it takes is turning one’s head to see the truth behind all the appearance. It is not until you’ve found the truth inside yourself that your life will change and reveal its deeper meaning to you.

Now, I don’t want to cavil nor be nosy but what has this to do with Freyja? Which myth of her is it connected to? Which symbol does it mention? Sure, the author has the right to convey their own vision in the deck but if it is called ‘The Oracle of the Goddess’ then there SHOULD be some connection to their myths and symbols, right?

The more I read the more doubts I have.

As far as I know calling three Hindu goddesses Trimurti is a mistake. ‘Trimurti’ is a Hindu expression for three male deities: Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva, while the female ones, Saraswati, Lakshmi and Parvati are referred to as Tridewi.

I am also not sure whether it was a good idea to single out Shakti as a separate goddess. I am not an expert in Hinduism and please correct me if I am wrong, but as far as I understand this concept, Shakti is a universal female energy which manifests itself in particular goddesses. If you include Kali or Lakshmi in the deck, what is the point to include Shakti as well?

And I believe the most dubious assumption is calling Tao a goddess. Tao is the life force on Earth, it does not take any forms and it is impossible to define it therefore it has no sex. It cannot be represented as goddess. To make you understand this concept better let me quote Tao Te Ching, Taoism’s sacred book:

The Tao (Way) that can be told of is not the eternal Tao;
The name that can be named is not the eternal name.
The Nameless is the origin of Heaven and Earth.
 
This is why it is impossible to make the personification of Tao and it makes no sense to attribute either positive nor negative features to Tao (therefore you cannot say it symbolises ‘soft and female’, this is represented by the Yin energy).*
 
I am also not sure if all the three, Inanna, Ishtar and Ashtarte, had to be included in the deck, after all they are alike and represent similar features.

And of course, a huge minus for including Mary in this deck. I explained clearly here why she is NOT a goddess.

ISSUE

33 cards

a book containing introduction, short information how to use the cards and information about each goddess presented

a box

In a book each card is presented in the following way:

– name of a goddess 

– area of her influence, myths, the development of her cult

– the oracle

box the oracle of the goddess

The size of cards is 13,5 x 9,5 cm

Back sides of cards show the pink lotus – like flower surrounded by the stars on the night sky with clouds in the corners.

EXAMPLE CARDS

Athena

Athena in The Oracle of the Goddess by Gayan Sylvie Winter&Jo Dosé

Brigid

Brigid in The Oracle of the Goddess by Gayan Sylvie Winter&Jo Dosé

Demeter

Demeter in The Oracle of the Goddess by Gayan Sylvie Winter&Jo Dosé

Isis

Isis – Hathor in The Oracle of the Goddess by Gayan Sylvie Winter&Jo Dosé

Lakshmi

Lakshmi in The Oracle of the Goddess Gayan by Sylvie Winter&Jo Dosé

Back side

back side gayan winter

© 2005 AGM AGMüller Urania, Neuhausen/Switzerland

Publisher: AGM AGMüller Urania

ISBN: 3 –03819 – 026 – 8

Amaterasu Omikami
Astarte
Bridget
Changing Woman
Chalchihuitlicue
Demeter
Diana
Freya
Gaia
Hathor
Hekate
Hera
Inanna
Ishtar
Isis
Ix Chel
Kali
Kuan Yin
Lakshmi
Lilith
Mawu
Mary
Pele
Rhiannon
Skadi
Shakti
Spiderwoman
Songi
Tao
Tara
Trimurti
Venus

* Many thanks to danceronthewaves for explaining this concept to me.

REVIEW: THE GODDESS ORACLE BY AMY SOPHIA MARASHINSKY AND HRANA JANTO

THE GODDESS ORACLE

by Amy Sophia Marashinsky&Hrana Janto

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

AMY SOPHIA MARASHINSKY is a writer, director, theatre producer and spiritual counseller who began her interest in mythology&fairy tales when she was just ten. Her other books and oracle card decks include Mermaid Magic and Oracle of the Grail Code: Restauration of the Feminine.  She has worked in New York, Japan and she currently resides in Western, MA, US.

Find out more about her on her website: http://www.amysophia.com

HRANA JANTO is an artist oriented at fantasy, history and mythology. She has provided images for television, book covers, goddess calendars, magazines and has exibited her work throughout the United States; she also paints portraits and do private commissions. She lives in New York.

Find out more about her on her website: http://www.hranajanto.com

ADVANTAGES

The choice of goddesses to this deck is definitely very good, you will find here not only European and Asian deities but also the African and American ones. It also has to be said that the attention is paid to all the cultures so there is no overrepresentation of any in particular (in other decks I have noticed domination of Celtic or Egyptian goddesses). It was also a good idea to include goddesses which may seem ‘exotic’ to an average user; in the deck you will come across not only Isis, Athena, Freyja or Lakshmi, but also Gyhldeptis, Pachamama, Sheila Na Gig or Vila. Authors ‘have done the homework’ in the field of psychology, psychoanalisys and modern interpretations of ancient myths which can be clearly seen in the choice of some cards such as Baba Yaga (who is considered to be Goddess Mother by my favourite Dr Clarissa Pinkola Estés, she claims that when Christian beliefs were introduced Baba Yaga was condemned as a dangerous witch and pushed away into the subconsciousnes) or Eurynome (who is de facto the main heroine of the Pelasgian creation myth quoted in the Greek Myths by Robert Graves). I also find it very correct that ONLY REAL GODDESSES are included in this deck and authors did not attach such cards as the one of Mary.

Another advantage is the book added to the set which indeed faciliates working with cards. It can be noticed at the first glance because it is much bigger than standard booklets added to similar decks. The content is a real encouragement to do self-work, ask yourself questions and make some effort. It is not a typical  ‘comforting deck’ just as many other oracle cards. I do not always agree with the author but I support her focus on psychology and overcoming problems thanks to our own strength. You will also find invocations and ritual to each goddess apart from the myths and divinationary meanings. Another helpful thing is the name of each card (eg. Amaterasu – Beauty, Aphrodite – Love), it helps to connect and memorise them.

Images of deities are consistent with ancient archetypes and heroines are depicted with their typical animals, plants, symbols, objects and themes. I think that the diversity in showing goddesses is surely appreciated by many users of this deck. Deities are presented in a various ways depending on their origins and the features their worshippers attributed to them: they have different skin and hair colours, types of body, age etc.  Authors  are not afraid to present them nude if it is adequate to their nature. I consider it to be a big advantage of this deck because I have seen the ones where nudity is persistently covered. Perhaps it is due to the times we live in and we are between a rock and a hard place: on one hand we are tempted by all the forms of pornography and on the other in our culture&mentality all the matters associated with body, nudity and sex remain a taboo. Sometimes I get this impression that it was easier to show naked body in ancient Hellas than in contemporary America where it is an offense to morality for a woman to show a breast (even if it is only to feed her child). I think it is also visible in the self censorship which art imposes on itself so I appreciate the authors of The Goddess Oracle even more for not following this hysteria.

DISADVANTAGES

Seeking for disadvantages I came to conclusion that some goddesses seem to be doubled when it comes to meaning such as eg. Yemanya and Oshun or Bast and Sekhmet. Personally I find the size of cards to be the greatest disadvantage; they are really big and thus difficult to shuffle. It would be much more comfortable to have them in smaller or even mini format.

ISSUE

52 cards

a book containing introduction and information how to use the cards plus some example spreads

a box

set

In a book each card is presented in the following way:

– name of a goddess 

– name of a card

– a first person narrated poem representing the goddess

– mythological background

– divination meaning mainly containing qustions for self work

– ritual suggestion

The size of cards is 9,5 x 13 cm

Back sides of cards show Sybil, the legendary Roman clairvoyant who offered her chronicles to the rulers to reveal the future of the city

EXAMPLE CARDS

Athena (as Minerva)

Athena in The Goddess Oracle deck by Hrana Janto&Amy Sophia Marashinsky

Brigid

Brigid in The Goddess Oracle deck by Hrana Janto&Amy Sophia Marashinsky

Demeter

Demeter in The Goddess Oracle by Hrana Janto&Amy Sophia Marashinsky

Isis

Isis in The Goddess Oracle by Hrana Janto&Amy Sophia Marashinsky

Lakshmi

Lakshmi in The Goddess Oracle by Amy Sophia Marashinsky&Hrana Janto

Back side

sybil

The Goddesses Oracle © 2006 U.S. Games Systems, Inc.

Publisher: U.S. Games Systems, Inc.

ISBN: 1 – 57281 – 546 – 9

Amaterasu
Aphrodite
Artemis
Baba Yaga
Bast
Blodeuwedd
Brigid
Cerridwen
Changing Woman
Coatlicue
Corn Woman
Demeter
Durga
Eostre
The Erinyes
Eurynome
Freyja
Gyhldeptis
Hathor
Hecate
Hestia
Inanna
Isis
Ix Chel
Kali
Kuan Yin
Lady of Beasts
Lakshmi
Lilith
Maat
Maeve
Maya
Minerva
Morgan le Faye
Nu Kua
Nut
Oshun
Oya
Pachamama
Pele
Rhiannon
Sedna
Sekhmet
Shakti
Sheila Na Gig
Sophia
Sphinx
Sulis
Tara
Uzume
Vila
Yemaya

REVIEW: GODDESS GUIDANCE ORACLE CARDS BY DOREEN VIRTUE

GODDESS GUIDANCE ORACLE CARDS

by Doreen Virtue

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Doreen Virtue, Ph. D., has completed her doctorate in the field of psychology. She says she originates from the family of people with strong psychic abilities and is a clairvoyant herself. She is particulairly interested in the subject of angels and has already published several books and decks of cards about them which turned out to be very popular.  Studying her biography you will find a lot of TV and radio shows where she appeared (very American style of presentation indeed). She resides in Hawaii. More on her page.

ADVANTAGES

Some of the messages are excellent and well-prepared from the point of view of psychology, such as e.g. Sekhmet (See yourself as strong and victorious. Don’t complain about anything. Don’t blame anyone or any condition. You’re the embodiment of strength, not victimhood), Guinevere (You needn’t be in a partnership to evoke romance; from my own experience I can say you have to grow up to accept this message) or Mary Magdalene (The lower levels of human bickering, judgement, and chaos are just that: lower levels. I choose to do my work from the level of the higher consciousness).

For me personally this deck will always have a sentimental value because these were the first cards of goddesses that I have come across in my life. One of the clairvoyants has been spreading them in a live fortune – telling programme on TV and as the person who has been interested in the topic of goddesses since childhood I was amazed and started to search for them.  Goddess Guidance Oracle Cards was the second deck that I bought (and I have to admit that the choice of decks in my native country is very limited, I bought most of mine in the UK online shops).

DISADVANTAGES

I was communicating easily with these cards for a long time, however when I started to analyse the myths of particular goddesses, it turned out that I can see slightly different messages than the author. And when I started to DIG DEEPER, the reasons to be amazed by this deck suddenly disappeared.

Goddess Guidance Oracle Cards is the deck which features not only real goddesses but also literary and religious heroines. Isolde IS NOT a goddess! I do understand that sometimes it is not easy to find a goddess in a myth because after christianisation she was reduced to a common mortal woman (this is probably what happened to Rhiannon, Gwenhwyfar and Morgaine) but despite her Celtic origins Isolde herself has nothing to do with goddesses!

The same objection applies to religious heroines such as Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of Jesus. The latter is presented in an arch-Catholic and Baroque style and the author claims that in the West, Mother Mary in undoubtedly the most famous goddess. Well no, Doreen, not at all! Mary has no divine features in any factions of Christianity.

The selection of goddesses to this deck is regular but still somehow controversial. I do not like the overrepresentation of the goddesses from the British Isles. Doreen chose Sulis and Coventina to represent the message suggesting purification and the contact with water. Why? They are both rather unknown and they were in fact venerated only in one place, in Bath on the British Isles. I believe that Anahita the great Zoroastrian goddess of water would be much better choice. She has been highly worshipped all over Persia for centuries and one of the most important ceremony  aimed at purification and consecration of water is dedicated to her. Zoroastrianism is one of few big ancient religions which survived to this day and placing Anahita in this deck would support its worshippers (does anyone know that the parents of Freddie Mercury practised Zoroastrianism?). But I have to honestly admit that the authors of all the decks I have come across for the unknown reasons honour a little known Sulis as the deity associated with water and purification. Anahita does not appear in any of godesses oracle decks, she is only included in Universal Goddess Tarot where she represents the Major Arcane of Temperance.

An inconsistency of style is a huge disadvantage. Doreen does not have one ‘court’ artist and she used the images of twelve different painters in this deck. All you get is a huge mish mash. Apart from really intriguing images of Brigid, Eireen or Kali you come across some really nasty scribbles of Coventina or Dana. I know, I know de gustibus non est disputandum et cetera but the problem is that most of the pictures reflect Doreen’s style anyway. They are  ‘princess-like’ or saying aloud: trashy. Cards are full of goddesses with the faces of little girls, flowers, birds, pastel colours etc. Even Ixchel who was always perceived as a crone here is not older than thirty. Even powerful Underword goddess  Rhiannon, a wife and a mother running like the wind on a palfrey, here is a little girl going slowly on a unicorn. C’mon! In myths and legends only pure and innocent virgins could touch a unicorn! Doreen must be really into unicorns because she made a whole seprate deck for them but Rhiannon has nothing to do with them. Why is a woman infantilising womanhood so much? Why does she treat me as if I were a little girl and squealed with delight thinking about dolls, playing Mummies&Daddies and Prince Charming riding a white horse to take me to the Land of Permanent Happiness?! Avoiding nudity is also a part of this problem. Even Aphrodite, the most beautiful and seductive Hellenic goddess here looks a fainting nymph tightly entangled in seaweeds so that no part of body can be seen. I dare say that through a huge popularity of her product Doreen somehow ‘brought up’ her followers in the same manner. Why? While browsing goddesses cards in Amazon I have recently come across a review of a realistic deck by Hrana Janto&Amy Sophia Marashinsky. A lady was complaining about nudity in the images and the fact that ‘there is no card of Mother Mary there’.

It is the same with messages. Generally speaking just like with angel oracle cards the main theme is ‘surrender all your worries to Heaven, everything will be all right’. Don’t get me wrong, I do not want to neglect the inner need of praying. Personally I talk to The One&Sophia on regular basis but leaving all the problems to Heavens do not help in self-development. It’s as if you stopped on the level of childhood, after all ‘child is not able to understand the sophisticated world of adults’. In fact, I don’t think it’s good that all the cards are positive by default. The world around us is not always positive and it is our duty to learn how to deal with negativity and to be able to do it even if we run out of faith. Have a look at the card of Sedna who was first brutally treated by her beloved and then her own father pulled her out of the boat to the sea and cut her hands off so that she couldn’t get in again. And all of the sudden she receives from Doreen a cheerful message Infinite Supply. You are supplied for today and all of your tomorrows because the Inuit believed that fish came into existence from her amputee hands. And guess what is best? When you look at the image, you will not find a cruelly treated disabled woman but a sleepy girl with her head resting on hands (!). This is the deck for consolation, not for an inner work and deeper insight into yourself. Unless you start to dig deeper and analyse actual myths  . But then you will suddenly find out that Athena would not suggest following an intuitive wisdom at all but the rules of logics instead. Or that the mother of Diana (or more correctly Artemis who has a separate card in this deck which even augments the confusion and the chaos of meanings) did not have a painless labour at all! Even though she gave birth to Artemis painlessly according to the Roman writers, she was struggling to deliver Apollo, Artemis’ twin, for many days and nights.

I have to say honestly that I do not like this whole esoteric hotchpotch which Doreen presents in her decks. ‘Call upon goddess to…’, ‘Ask angels for…’, Christian figures, Pagan figures, Ascended Masters, etc all mixed together. If we throw everything we have in our fridge to a cauldron, we will not get a tasty soup at all. You have to remember that people using these cards were more or less brought up in the Christian faith where you believe in One God. Therefore if angels, unicorns or goddesses say to you ‘Surrender all your problems to us’ then why do you need God at all? I think that anyone who creates the deck of goddesses cards should take it into consideration because really there is no need to become a Pagan to use such decks. You don’t have to actually believe in goddesses to grow and develop your mental strength by using their cards.

This is why with my whole respect to Doreen I believe she should stick to the angel cards and leave the topic of goddesses to people with more professional attitude. Besides it seems that she treats her goddess oracle deck somehow with disregard as one of her many decks. It is not recommended nor featured on her page and it is not so easy to find it among others. I guess it’s similar to mothers with multiple children: you take care of all of them but you can’t concentrate on all of them.

ISSUE

44 cards

a booklet where each card is presented in a following way:

– name of a goddess, name of a card, short, one or two sentence introductory message from a goddess

– message from goddess

– different meanings of a card

– a short presentation about a goddess

and advice how to use cards

a box

doreen virtue

The size of cards is slightly bigger than the standard one (12,5 x 9 cm) and they have ‘gold plated’ edges. The issue is very good and comfortable: a box is small and handy and both booklet and cards are well-fitting.

Back side suggests these are the cards of queens rather than goddesses.

EXAMPLE CARDS

Athena

Brigid

Brigid in the deck of Doreen Virtue

Demeter

is not featured in this deck

Isis

Lakshmi

Back side

Goddess Guidance Oracle Cards copyright @2004 by Doreen Virtue

Publisher: Hay House

ISBN 978 – 1 – 4019-0301 – 5

ISBN 1 – 4019 – 0301 – 0

Abundantia
Aeracura
Aine
Aphrodite
Artemis
Athena
Bast
Brigid
Butterfly Maiden
Cordelia
Coventina
Damara
Dana
Diana
Eireen
Freyja
Green Tara
Guinevere
Hathor
Ishtar
Isis
Isolt
Ixchel
Kali
Kuan Yin
Lakshmi
Maat
Maeve
Mary Magdalene
Mawu
Mother Mary
Nemetona
Oonagh
Ostara
Pele
Rhiannon
Saraswati
Sedna
Sekhmet
Sige
Sulis
Vesta
White Tara
Yemanya

IXCHEL

IXCHEL

Ixchel or Ix Chel (pronounced as [iʃˈtʃel]) is the Maya goddess mostly connected with medicine, fertility and pregnancy and therefore she is considered to be the guardian of doctors, midwives, healers and shamans. She is associated with the moon (particularly its waning phase), earth, water especially in the form of rain, weaving, divination and war. Her name probably comes from the stem ‘chel’ meaning rainbow, it was written with a pictogram signifying ‘red’ and that is why she is called  Lady of the Rainbow.

ABOUT GODDESS

Not many myths about her remained until recent times. According to one of the legends she was married to Itzamna and had thirteen sons with him, two of them were the creators of heaven and earth. In another version she is the wife of earth god Voltan. There is also the legend which claims that she created the world together with Feathered Serpent. However I have found a certain significant story about her which I am presenting basing on the information found on the pages: http://www.goddessgift.com/goddess-myth … x-chel.htm and http://www.crystalinks.com/mayangods.html.

As a young girl Ixchel was so beautiful that all the gods fell in love with her except one,  Kinich Ahau, the sun god, whom she really cared for. She was staring at the sparkling golden lover but the longer she was chasing after him the worse weather was becoming: tides were rising creating floods which inuaded the lands and destroyed crops. However Ixchel blinded by love and staring at the sun did not even realize how serious damages she was provoking. Being a talented weaver she finally found the way to Kinich Ahau’s heart by offering him a beautiful shirt. They soon became lovers and four jaguar gods were born from this union. Each of them was unseen during the night and each got one side of the world to protect and to bear the pillars of the world.

Unfortunately, the relationship with the sun god made Ixchel’s grandfather very angry. In rage he threw the thunder which struck the goddess killing her immediately. She was lying dead for 183 days until hundreds of dragonflies* gathered on her body and began to sing to resurrect her. Ixchel came back to the sun god’s palace but the time of torments has not finished yet. Her lover was impulsive and obsessed with jealousy so he wrongly accused the goddess of romancing with his brother the Morning Star and threw her out of the sky. She found a shelter among the vulture gods but when Kinich Ahau heard about it he hurried to beg her forgiveness and promised to treat her well this time. She agreed and at first all seemed to be good but then the sun god became suspicious, jealous and aggressive again. This made Ixchel realize he would never change and she decided to leave him forever. To avoid any further harassment she waited till he fell asleep  and slipped from the palace. She then took the form of a jaguar and became invisible so no matter how hard Kinich Ahau was searching for her he was not able to find her. Ixchel herself went to live in her island Cozumel where she was taking care of pregnant women and those who were in labour.

She was mostly worshipped on the islands of Cozumel and Isla Mujeres. On Cozumel there are many evidences of women’s pilgrimages aiming to ask the goddess for good marriages and offspring. Ruins of her temples remained till modern times and it is considered that the priests hidden in a huge statue were announcing the messages of the oracle. The second island was famous for small statues of the goddess which were left there as a thank you gift. They were so numerous that Hernandez de Cordoba, a Spanish conquistador, called this place Isla Mujeres meaning ‘The Island of Women’. Ixchel was also worshipped in Acalan and not much is known about the specific cult but there is a supposition that certain rituals were taking place during the sixth day of the moon phase and after childbirth when a woman was having a bath.

IMAGES, SYMBOLS AND ANIMALS

She was presented as an old woman with the ears of a jaguar or a serpent entwined around her head and sometimes she had claws instead of feet and hands. Jaguars and serpents together with eagles were  the most important animals  for the Maya because a powerful and persistent jaguar was able to tresspass the barrier between the world of the day and the night** while a serpent crawling on the soil and shedding its skin was the symbol of earth  (as it was already mentioned in the blog entry about Gaia a serpent symbolizes wisdom, life cycles and renewal, you can also read about the sign of Ouroboros ). As a guardian of women and children she was also depicted with a rabbit, the symbol of fertility and large families.

One of her symbols was an inverted jug resembling a womb and thus being the symbol of menstruation, dryness and the time of growing old (similarly to the waning phase of the moon). An inverted jug was also the symbol of rain and rainy season therefore Ixchel was considered to cause floods. Crossed bones were traditionally attributed to her and she was believed to wear a skirt with this image which was a connection with the world of the dead and had purifying abilities (e.g. when someone died because of plague their bones were put on the crossroads to make the disease go away from people’s homes). Ixchel also carried a spear and a shield during wars.

Ixchel in The Dresden Codex

Ix Chel

Ixchel

Ixchel

DIVINATION MEANING

Person

This card may show a grandmother or an older woman. In positive meaning this is a woman who is satisfied and feels accomplished in all the phases of her life, she is not afraid of challenges and rejects outside pressure. She is comprehensive and wise through experience. She supports her loved ones in difficult moments and protects her family. In negative meaning this card represents a young woman who gets involved in the relationship with a man without thinking and then she is abused by him.

Professions: doctor, nurse, midwife, paramedic, farmer, geologist, meteorologist, weaver, taylor, embroidery person, athlete, warrior, fortuneteller.

Advice

Take good care of your health, remember you cannot exploit your body forever. Spend more time with your family, especially with children. Search for support of an older woman (possibly your grandmother). A physical or mental abuse may be involved in this situation. If you are considering starting studies connected with medicine or midwifery this card confirms it is a good choice. Be careful and conscientous to avoid accidents.

Love

If you are in a relationship: if you remain in the relationship which gives you neither emotional fulfillment nor safety this card says clearly it is high time to quit it.

If you are single: do not start a relationship just to avoid being alone. It is probable that you will care more about this union than your partner. Beware of abuse in relationship. Make sure that a short – lived romance will not result in an unexpected pregnancy.

Finances

Possible expences connected with the pregnancy. Possible closing of transaction, purchase of the land, house or other long-term investment. Check carefully the contract before signing it because you may overlook or misunderstand something.

Health

For a young woman it may signify pregnancy and childbirth while for an older one it predicts menopause. In the spread it ALWAYS suggests consulting the doctor. When it appears at the end of the spread concerning health, it suggests recovery and successful childbirth. Endangered parts of the body: reproductive organs (ovaries, Fallopian tubes, utero, cervix, vagina), skeletal system, divestive system, circulatory system. Possible disorders in menstruating.

CARDS

Ixchel appears in four decks but none of her images is really consistent with the original Maya renderings (no inverted jug, no crossed bones skirt, no jaguar ears and no older woman on any of them except of Hrana Janto and Sandra M. Stanton’s paintings!).

Ixchel in The Goddess Wisdom Cards by Jill Fairchild, Regina Schaare & Sandra M. Stanton

Ixchel in The Goddess Wisdom Cards by Jill Fairchild, Regina Schaare & Sandra M. Stanton

Ixchel in The Goddess Oracle by Hrana Janto&Amy Sophia Marashinsky (I wouldn’t attribute creativity to Ixchel as my first choice but I like the image especially its details, pay attention to her dragonfly earrings).

Ixchel with a jaguar in The Goddesses Knowledge Cards by Susan Seddon Boulet&Michael Babcock

Ixchel in The Goddesses Knowledge Cards by Susan Seddon Boulet&Michael Babcock

Ixchel in Goddess Guidance Oracle Cards by Doreen Virtue

Ixchel in Goddess Guidance Oracle Cards by Doreen Virtue

Ixchel in The Oracle of the Goddess by Gayan Sylvie Winter&Jo Dosé (but why with a falcon and not with a jaguar or a serpent?)

Ixchel in The Oracle of the Goddess by Gayan Sylvie Winter&Jo Dosé

Ixchel in Oracle of the Goddess by Anna Franklin&Paul Mason

Ixchel in Oracle of the Goddess by Anna Franklin&Paul Mason

Computer game and Wagnerian Valkirya-like Ixchel in Goddesses&Sirens by Stacey Demarco&Jimmy Manton

Ixchel in Goddesses&Sirens by Stacey Demarco&Jimmy Manton

*Dragonflies as the name speaks itself are connected with dragons and serpents in many cultures.

**The Maya people believed that the day belonged to people and the visible world while the night was the realm of their ancestors’ ghosts.

I used the information found on English wikipedia and the following pages:

http://www.pantheon.org/articles/i/ixchel.html , http://www.whats-your-sign.com/mayan-sy … xchel.html ,
http://www.answers.com/topic/ixchel , http://www.orderwhitemoon.org/goddess/Ixchel.html ,
http://thebasicsofanything.com/ixchel-f … rain-fores